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Bumble Hole community art lifts the spirits

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Two community art projects which have grown organically out of the covid crisis, continue to flourish at the popular nature reserve.

Two community art projects which have grown organically out of the covid crisis, continue to flourish at the popular nature reserve.
The Tree of Hope was created out of recycled materials in a recently maintained coppice. Before long, people were leaving messages of hope and remembrance inscribed on wooden ‘cookies’ hanging from its branches. People visiting it can still request their own wooden disc to be inscribed with their own message. Details of how to do this are on the tree itself. Requests are managed by the Bumble Hole Conservation Group, who have also created a bird feeding station in an old hawthorn stump close by which is proving very popular with both visitors and the birds themselves.


The Tree of Hope and bird feeding station are located on the right hand side between the visitor centre and Cobbs Engine House, known locally as The Stack.


A member of the community has also inspired others, through social media, to help create a stone ‘Covid’ snake made up of brightly painted stones. People are encouraged to paint their own stone and bring it along to the reserve and add it to the gradually growing and very colourful snake. The snake runs alongside the canal just off the Pym’s entrance.


Councillor Karen Shakespeare, cabinet member responsible for nature reserves, said:

These are just two of the community-led projects co-ordinated by our dedicated, passionate groups of people. Community involvement at Bumble Hole, as at all nature reserves, is important in helping our green spaces to flourish.

Brenda Myers, one of a number of volunteers for Bumble Hole Conservation Group, who also helps oversee the art projects said: 

The Tree of Hope and the stone snake just grew organically as community art projects. The tree in particular really seems to have fulfilled a need during lockdown and beyond. People needed something positive to focus on and the beauty of the reserve seems to have prompted a sense of optimism.
We’re always keen to work with other local people who may want to help us make the reserve the best it can be. We are on social media and would encourage people to get in touch that way so they can find out how they can join in. We have a Facebook page. Just go to Bumble Hole Visitors Centre.”

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